Tag Archives: scrum

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Innovel Announces New Certified Scrum Training Courses in Canada

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I am really excited to be back Canada with public Scrum certification courses, after years honing our private and public Scrum training in international markets.

Early bird rates are available and registration is now open in Toronto, Calgary, Edmonton, Vancouver and Montreal:

More fun, More value, More Retention

We offer more than the basics of Scrum in our CSM® courses. While we will teach you about the Scrum framework, the roles, and the techniques to plan and implement Scrum in your projects, we also make this very interactive and enjoyable 2-day workshop style class useful with discussion exercises and group-oriented simulations. 

And, our new Certified Scrum Master Plus™ is CSM® with a 3rd day add-on to help with scaling (multi-team development) questions, Scrum Master coaching and facilitation skills, and creating an implementation plan for your first Scrum. Our students often say that the CSM should be a 3-day course to allow more time to absorb and understand the ideas. They asked, we created this highly beneficial third day, exclusively available with Innovel.

Certified Scrum Product Owner® Training by Innovel will show you how to effectively work with a Scrum team to take a product from idea to implementation. While we cover Scrum basics, this course focuses on Agile Product Management, Lean Startup, working with stakeholders, prioritization, reducing risk and maximizing business value.

Contact rdymond@innovel.net if you would like more information about our private or public training courses or to request a group discount code (10% off for groups of 3 more).


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What do you know about speed 1/5? Boeing 737 Final Assembly

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How long does it take to do the final assembly of a Boeing 737? Final assembly includes wings, tail, wheels, engines, interiors, wiring, cockpit controls and flight systems.

The Boeing 737 is assembled in one plant in Renton Washington near Seattle. Since implementing Lean thinking and continuous improvement monthly output of 737s from Boeing’s Renton plant has tripled:
1999  11
2005  21
2014  42
2017  47
2018  52

As of April 2015 the two 737 production lines produce 42 planes per month, or 2 planes per day. It takes 9 days from the time an empty shell arrives at the factory until a completed plane roles out the door ready to fly to the paint shop.

Interested in learning how to speed up your projects? Innovel offers Certified Scrum Master and Lean and Agile for Managers courses to show you how to speed up your IT, Marketing, and Development projects. Contact us for training and coaching in Lean, Agile and Scrum.

A timelapse of a Boeing 737 being assembled.


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New ebook, Agile Advice

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book coverMy colleague Mishkin Berteig started his Agile Advice blog in 2005 when we were both doing Agile coaching for teams at Capital One. His blog was one of my favorite Agile blogs, he was getting out the lessons we were learning and providing smart succinct advice. In many ways Mishkin’s blog was ahead of its time, offering sage advice to issues and situations that many people had yet to come across. Mishkin has taken his blog content, tuned it up and added additional interesting stories in his new ebook Agile Advice. You can check out the blog for many great ideas, while the ebook is a more convenient format for those looking to improve their coaching and Agile transition knowledge.


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How Healthcare.gov could have saved billions of dollars and been delivered in 1/2 the time.

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By September 2014 spending on the 15 state health insurance exchanges and healthcare.gov will climb to over $8 Billion dollars*. This huge expenditure for health insurance shopping sites could have been avoided if the federal and state governments had mandated and followed modern software development practices.

onebillionincash

$1 Billon USD. We’ll need eight for healthcare shopping sites.

How did the governments, on something as high profile as healthcare reform, decide to use a risky 40 year old process to manage the delivery of the health insurance exchanges?

Comparisons were made between healthcare.gov and amazon.com, yet the way in which these two websites are developed could not be more different. Healthcare.gov used the phased or waterfall approach with 55 different contractors responsible for different aspects, and no one responsible for delivering finished product. Amazon.com uses Scrum, an Agile approach that emphasizes small cross functional teams who deliver working tested features every 2 weeks.

To understand how a website like healthcare.gov could have been delivered using the Amazon.com approach, I created a short illustrated video. This video demonstrates, in a simple way, how to deliver a site like a health insurance exchange using a fraction of the budget in about half the time. These techniques are very similar to how companies like Spotify, Google, Square, Valve, Salesforce, Amazon and many others manage getting software development done.

Got a few minutes to save billions of dollars on software development?

I hope you like this talk, please subscribe on youtube if you are interested in future videos. If you are looking for in person training for yourself or help for your organization, please contact me:

http://www.innovel.net or http://www.scrumtraining.com

Cheers
Robin Dymond, CST

*Health and Human Services data

*Report by Jay Angoff on Health Exchange enrollment costs per state


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Video: Booting Up Customers to Build Great Products

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This is a video of a talk I gave at Agile Tour 2011 in Vilnius Lithuania in October 2011.

Your New Customer has no clue what Agile is, however they have lots of assumptions about how they will “get the product done.” Do they know how to work effectively with you? Do they know all of the business and user issues that the product will need to solve and how to solve them? Have they built a product like this one before? Are the 100% committed to being the product owner or do they have other jobs too?

We’ll discuss how turn a customer into a Product Owner, from the first meeting to creating the first backlog, through to one year into development. We’ll go through key learning points that your new Product Owners and teams will have to transition through, and techniques you can use to make your life and theirs easier. Come prepared to learn tested hands on techniques you can apply in working with your customers.


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Should scrum team members talk directly with customers?

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A recent discussion on linkedin was started based on the question: Should teams talk directly with users or customers?

It provoked me to write the long response below.

“What do you mean by customer? Do you mean user? Sponsor? Another manager?

The Product Owner (PO) should be representing the various stakeholders for the system being built. The PO should also be creating alignment among the team and the stakeholders as to what needs to be accomplished in the release. This is a balancing act between the various needs, business and technical. The PO is not an information hub, everything doesn’t have to go through the PO. A good PO creates alignment around the vision and the solution, and steers based on their ongoing learning and subject matter expertise.

So I’d split my response into the stakeholder groups:

For users:

In general it is a good idea for a Scrum team members to talk to users. As Geir Amjso mentioned, the PO can become a bottleneck if they try to control all information. Also their maybe some nuance that a user can provide that will help a developer understand the problem more clearly. This conversation is framed in the context of a sprint and is about clarification and understanding to implement the solution.

Another benefit of having users and developers interact is that spark of innovation. Innovation happens when people with tools and techniques really start to understand a problem. Users sitting down with developers creates empathy and helps teams become motivated to provide pain relief or innovations that surprise or delight.

For sponsors:

Not a good idea without the PO around. The sponsor is usually more concerned with the high level issues and the politics/expectation management for the product/project. The sponsors should engage the PO, and if they are going around them to the team, there is something else going on.

For other managers:

It depends. It may make sense if there are dependencies with other teams/vendors and the team is managing those issues within the sprint. It may also be an end run around the PO to get work done that is not planned in the sprint. In this case the team should refer them to the PO.

Scrum does specify meetings where interactions between teams and customers are more formal. However Scrum says nothing about restricting communications to the Scrum meetings. If communications are restricted to these meetings only the team will be slower and have less opportunities to learn. As a Scrummaster the goal is to get great software developed and do it with the highest level of engagement from all parties. This means there are lots of communications that should happen on an ongoing basis between all members of the project community. A Scrummaster needs to enable work to flow from request to working software, and this involves maintaining the flow of information. Will their be deviation? Sure, however the Scrummaster is there to detect when the team or the stakeholders are getting off track (i.e. adding scope, changing direction, etc.) and help them stay on track.

Sure you can talk to the team! Take a seat!


Sure you can talk to the team! Take a seat!


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Kangaroo boxing: Scrum vs. Kanban.

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Software development has its trends and its innovations. The term Agile came about because people practicing different iterative workstyles decided to come together and develop a brand, Agile, that represents their common principles and values. Agile workstyles include Scrum, eXtreme Programming (XP), Crystal Clear, Feature Driven Development (FDD), and Dynamic Systems Development Method DSDM. Then people like Mary and Tom Poppendeick recognized that Agile software development could benefit from the ideas of the Toyota Production System, also called Lean for western implementations. Now some of the proponents of Lean, many of them from the Agile community, have been attacking Agile methods like Scrum, claiming that Lean is “better.” To me this doesn’t make sense. Agile and Lean ideas are complementary. Ideas from Lean come from manufacturing, so applying them to software development requires care and understanding of how software is different, and why. More importantly however, the conflict goes against the spirit of Agile, and does not do the software development community any good. It drives a wedge and a barrier where there should be none. It causes proponents of either camp to ignore or resist good ideas from the other. Primarily this conflict seems driven by personalities in the community who see personal gain and status with attacking another’s work. The idea that in a community of thinkers one can gain reputation by putting down other proven and legitimate ideas is false. Gaining reputation in a community of thinkers such as software development requires that you show leadership in new ideas AND in integrating new ideas with proven ideas already in place. The battle of Scrum vs. Kanban reminds me of kangaroo boxing… Richard Attenborough narrates…